Your Career Can Survive a DUI

Posted by Steven Eversole | Jul 29, 2013 | 0 Comments

In Vermont, the deputy chief of police was arrested for operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol.

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Our Birmingham, Alabama DUI defense lawyers understand he was stopped by state troopers after failing to properly use a turn signal. He was off-duty at the time and has been placed on paid administrative leave pending an internal investigation of the incident.

We understand that for some individuals, a DUI is a bigger deal than for others. For them, fighting the charges is about more than avoiding the misdemeanor fines, license suspension and/or jail time. A conviction could mean the loss of public favor and possibly even one's job.

Our job is to help you avoid some of those long-term consequences, if at all possible. Even if we aren't able to have the charges dropped entirely, we can often negotiate a situation in which the most serious charges are dropped in exchange for a guilty plea on lesser charges. In some cases, those might include moving violations, rather than criminal offenses. That could make a bi difference in terms of how your career will be affected.

And speaking of affected careers, it's important to keep in mind that your career most likely will be able to survive a DUI arrest. To offer a few examples of individuals who are proof of this:

–Timothy Broas was recently re-nominated to the post of ambassador to the Netherlands by President Barack Obama. His nomination was withdrawn last summer, just a few days after his arrest for speeding, drunk driving and resisting arrest. The latter two charges were later dismissed, while Broas pleaded guilty to the lesser charge of driving while impaired.
–George W, Bush. The former U.S. president was arrested for DUI back in 1976 in Maine. He pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor charge, paid a $150 fine and had his driving privileges revoked for a time. He went on to become the president.
–Dick Cheney. The former Vice President of the United States was previously convicted of DUI back in 1962 in Wyoming. He paid a $150 fine, had a 30-day license suspension. He was arrested again for the same offense the following year, and that time paid a $100 fine. He later went on to become vice president.

These are just a few individuals who had convictions who went on to continue success. Your chances of success are greatly improved if you can avoid conviction altogether. Our goal is to help you do that.

Some things to consider as you ponder your next move:
–Don't assume that just because your blood-alcohol content measured at 0.08 above that you will be found guilty. There are sometimes ways your attorney can work around this to establish reasonable doubt.
–Don't discuss your arrest with others. You could be hurting your chances of a solid defense.
–Don't offer a statement to police without your attorney present.
–Don't drive if your license has been suspended as a result of the arrest.
–Write down every detail you can think of about your DUI arrest as soon as you have the opportunity to do so.
–Contact an experienced DUI attorney to help you determine your best course of action moving forward.


If you have been arrested for DUI in Birmingham, call Defense Lawyer Steven Eversole at (866) 831-5292.

Additional Resources:
Burlington deputy police chief arrested for DUI, July 21, 2013, By Adam Sullivan, WCAX.com
More Blog Entries:
Birmingham DUI Lawyers: Know Your Checkpoint Rights, July 12, 2013, Birmingham DUI Defense Lawyer Blog

About the Author

Steven Eversole

J.D., Samford University's Cumberland School of Law, Birmingham, Alabama B.A., University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

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