App Breath Tests Could Prevent Alabama DUI Charges this Holiday Season

Posted by Steven Eversole | Dec 05, 2013 | 0 Comments

When out drinking at a bar, after a dinner party, or even returning from a company party, it can be difficult to know if you have gone “over the limit.” While drinking and driving is not necessarily illegal, drinking too much and driving over the limit is. There are a number of ways you can prevent drunk driving: get a ride from a friend, take a cab, or take public transport. Now a new phone app may allow drinkers to test their own blood alcohol before getting behind the wheel.

Alcohol breathalyzer dot test

Drinking can lead to unexpected DUI charges, arrests, and a conviction that can carry serious penalties. Our Birmingham DUI defense attorneys are dedicated to helping Alabama residents protect their rights when facing drinking and driving charges. We are also abreast of technological and legal developments to keep Alabama drivers safe and legally protected.
A new device, known as the BACtrack Mobile Breathalyzer allows you to test your blood alcohol level so that you can prevent DUI when you get behind the wheel. The $150 dollar device has the ability to analyze your breath for its alcohol content, at least according to the manufacturers. It connects to your iOS device and works via Bluetooth. Android has also developed a mobile app to test for blood-alcohol content as well. The app also provides a countdown timer at which point you should blow into the device. In seconds, the app will display your BAC reading and provide you with an interpretation of the BAC results. For example, at .098, your judgment is impaired and your motor skills are disabled. In Alabama .08% means that you are legally over the limit.


When you are arrested, officers will be looking for evidence of intoxication. This may be examined and demonstrated through field sobriety tests, witness statements, and subjective input from an arresting officer. Blood-alcohol content is often used to prove DUI and can evidence can be shown through breathalyzer test results, blood, or urine samples. Proving BAC can be difficult and requires the backing of scientific tests. If these tests are not administered or calibrated properly, results could be erroneous. It is also likely that mobile applications could produce inaccurate results; however, a self-administered BAC test could give you a better picture of where you are at if you are thinking of getting behind the wheel.

The test recommends that you wait 15 minutes after drinking and eating. The app does not analyze GPS or jurisdictional differences between levels of blood-alcohol content, rather it simply recommends that anyone who is driving over .01 refrain from getting behind the wheel. This should encourage anyone from drinking and driving; however, it is important to remember that just because you were drinking and driving does not mean you are guilty of a crime. Law enforcement officers must prove not only that you were drinking, but that you were in fact, over the legal limit. This mobile app could prevent drunk driving accidents and could give drivers a better indication of their blood alcohol levels before getting behind the wheel.

If you have been arrested for DUI in Birmingham, call Defense Lawyer Steven Eversole at (866) 831-5292.

More Blog Entries:
New DUI Defense: Too Drunk to be Prosecuted? Oct. 12, 2013, Birmingham Underage DUI Defense Lawyer Blog
Field Sobriety Tests Only One Piece of the Puzzle in Alabama DUI Cases, Aug. 25, 2013, Birmingham DUI Defense Lawyer Blog

About the Author

Steven Eversole

J.D., Samford University's Cumberland School of Law, Birmingham, Alabama B.A., University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

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